The Sleep Advisors

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Last Updated on July 29, 2022 by Peter

How To Go To Bed Earlier Every Day?

Do you want to learn how to go to bed earlier but you don’t know where to start? Well, start here!

The first thing we want to let you know is if you’ve ever thought to yourself “Wow. I got to get my life in order” – you are not alone. We all feel like that sometimes. However, what funny about it is that most of us embark on that journey by doing the same thing – getting our sleeping habits in order. We start planning on how to go to bed earlier, how to get up rested and ready to take on a new day and so on.

What’s also funny about it is most of us don’t know how to do it or we’re just unable to. It just feels hard, doesn’t it? Well, what if we told you that there’s a set of rules to follow that can help you fall asleep earlier? Would you be interested in trying them out?

If you would, stick around for a few more moments, because we’re going to drop some truth bombs and share some knowledge with you. And, if you stay till the end, you have our word you’ll learn how to fall asleep earlier – that’s the Sleep Advisors’ guarantee.

Table of Contents
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    How can I stop staying up late?

    First things first – you need to have some discipline in your life. Without it, you’ll just never get to where you want to. So, what we want you to do to is take a good look at yourself and see what changes you can make to help you stop staying up till 2-3 am.

    And, if self-reflection isn’t your strongest suit – don’t worry! Even though we’re not experts on sleep medicine – we’ve got tips for days. Check them out!

    An image of a woman shocked by late night hours.

    Spend at least an hour outside

    We know you’re probably used to spending most of your time indoors – whether you’re working or just relaxing at home. And, that’s perfectly fine. However, if you want to get better sleep, you need to start spending more time outdoors. Why? Because sunlight helps regulate our internal clock (also known as the circadian rhythm).

    An image of a couple running.

    In other words, exposure to sunlight during the day will make it easier for you to fall asleep at night. How? Well, sunlight (or any light for that matter) suppresses the body’s production of melatonin – a hormone that makes us feel sleepy. So, the less melatonin we have in our system, the better we’ll be able to sleep early at night because the secretion of melatonin will go through the roof when you finally enter that lovely pitch-black bedroom.

    Hit the gym

    If you thought that working out only benefits your physical health, you were dead wrong. Exercise has been shown to improve sleep quality. And, that’s not surprising when you think about it because, during a workout, our body temperature rises and then quickly drops after we’re done (which is the same thing that happens when we fall asleep).

    An image of a young woman stretching before a workout.

    But, how does that help us sleep better? Well, the drop in body temperature signals to our brain that it’s time to go to bed. So, if you want to get better sleep, start working out on a regular basis. Not only will you improve your physical health but you’ll also give your sleep quality a nice little boost.
    Also, you’ll just be tired. And, when you’re tired, you doze off faster. It’s as simple as that.

    Skip screen time an hour before sleep

    This one is a no-brainer. We all know that staring at screens right before bed is a recipe for disaster because the blue light emitted from them suppresses the production of melatonin (the sleep hormone) and throws off our circadian rhythm and sleep-wake cycle.

    An image of a woman feeling tired after late night screen time.

    So, if you want to get better nighttime sleep, start by putting away all electronic devices at least an hour before hitting the sack. And, if you absolutely can’t live without your phone or tablet, make sure to use a blue light filter. It’ll help reduce the amount of blue light exposure and make it easier for you to nod off.

    No coffee & alcohol

    We all know that coffee is a stimulant and that alcohol is a depressant. So, it should come as no surprise that they have opposite effects on sleep. Caffeine will make it harder for you to drift away while alcohol will make you feel drowsy and sleepy.

    However, just because alcohol makes you feel sleepy doesn’t mean it’s good for your sleep. In fact, alcohol disrupts REM sleep – the deepest and most restorative stage of sleep. So, even though you may feel like you’re getting a good night’s sleep after drinking, in reality, you’re not.

    A male's hand over the glass of alcohol.

    So, if you want to get better sleep, cut out caffeine and alcohol before bed. Your body (and your mind) will thank you for it.

    Drink tea around 7 PM

    This one is more of a personal preference but we find that drinking tea around 7 pm helps us sleep better at night. And, there are a couple of reasons for that.

    An image of a woman in socks on bed drinking tea.

    Firstly, it’s the perfect way to unwind after a long day. You can take a few minutes to yourself, relax, and just enjoy the moment. Secondly, certain teas (like chamomile and lavender) have calming properties that can help you relax and catch some ZZZs more easily.

    So, if you’re looking for a way to wind down before bed, try drinking some tea. It just might do the trick.

    Keep your bedroom’s temperature around 22-23 C degrees

    The ideal bedroom temperature for getting a good night’s sleep is around 22-23 degrees Celsius. So, if you’re having trouble sleeping, try adjusting the thermostat in your room. You might find that a slightly cooler temperature is exactly what you needed to catch some rest.

    An image of a young man sleeping in a deep sleep phase.

    And, if you’re still struggling falling asleep early, consider using a cooling pillow or lavender essential oil. Both can help cool down your body and encourage relaxation.

    Maintain a routine every evening

    You need to start by creating a bedtime routine. And, we’re not just talking about reading a book or taking a bath (although those things can certainly help). We’re talking about establishing a set of rituals, practising healthy sleep hygiene and sticking to that earlier bedtime – for more than just a few days.

    Here are a few we do to keep a consistent sleep schedule and get plenty of sleep each night.

    An image of a satisfied man in a bed.

    Meditation/yoga

    There are a number of ways to meditate, but the goal is always to focus and clear your mind. If you’re new to meditation, there are plenty of apps and websites that can guide you through the process. Once you get the hang of it, you can do it anywhere – even in bed!

    a woman doing yoga

    Yoga is another great way to relax both your body and mind before bed. There are tons of different yoga poses that you can do, but some of our favourites for sleep are the child’s pose, cat/cow pose, and legs-up-the-wall pose. Again, there are plenty of resources available online if you’re not sure where to start.

    Take a warm bath

    There’s nothing like a warm bath to relax your muscles and help you prepare for a great night’s sleep. Taking a warm bath before bed can help your body temperature drop, which is ideal for falling asleep. Add some soothing aromatherapy or add a few drops of lavender oil to your bathtub to further relax your senses.

    An image of a woman having a warm bath in a bath tub.

    If you don’t have time for a full bath, a quick shower or even just washing your face and hands with warm water can help to relax you.

    Read a book, comic or newspapers

    There’s no right or wrong way to do this – just find something that interests you and stick with it. Whether it’s a book, a comic book, a graphic novel, or even the news, reading before bed can help you wind down and prepare for sleep.

    an image of a woman wrapped in a jaymag blanket reading a book

    We recommend avoiding screens though (including your phone), as the blue light can make it harder to fall asleep. If you don’t have any paper on you – a Kindle is a solid alternative as it emits a lot less blue light than ordinary screens. However, we’d still stick with paper pages if possible.

    Play relaxing music

    If you find it hard to quiet your mind before bed, try playing some soft, calming music. There are tons of great playlist options available online – from apps to playlists, but if you want – you can create your own.

    We ourselves love some smooth jazz and mellow blues, but we do suggest avoiding anything with lyrics, as that can actually activate your brain instead of relaxing it.

    Write down worries & solutions to unload

    If you tend to lie awake at night worrying about things, try keeping a journal by your bed. Write down your worries and any possible solutions before you go to sleep.

    An image of a man suffering from anxiety.

    This can help unload some of the stress and allow you to fall asleep more easily. Plus, if you have a solution already written down, you’ll be more likely to act on it when you wake up!

    How can I sleep at 10 PM?

    Going to bed early doesn’t mean hitting the sheet at 8 pm. 10 in the evening is more than good. This will leave you with more than enough to get a full night’s rest and still get up at 6 am to tackle the daily challenges.

    Now, the challenge we have to conquer is saying goodbye to being a night owl. This may be easier said than done, especially if you are used to staying up late. But it is possible and here are some tips on how to do just that:

    Change your mindset

    The first step is to change your mindset about going to bed early. You need to tell yourself that it’s important to get a full night’s sleep and that you are going to make it happen.

    An image of a happy young man due to healthy sleep hygiene.

    Get up early

    The second step is to get up early. This may seem counter-intuitive, at first, but getting up earlier will actually help you sleep earlier at night. When you get up early, your body will inevitably feel drained and tired in the evening which will make you sleep like a baby.

    how to wake up relaxed and happy

    Create a sleep-friendly environment

    Your bedroom should be a haven for sleep. Make sure it’s dark, quiet, and cool. If you have trouble making the room dark or quiet, try using an eye mask or investing in some blackout curtains.

    An image of a dark modern bedroom.

    Does staying up late age you?

    Will early bedtime help you stay younger? Hell yeah. A full eight hours of sleep is important for your body to regenerate and heal. Not only that, but getting enough sleep will help keep your skin looking young and fresh.

    An image of a sleepy middle aged man with beard in a bathrobe holding an alarm clock.

    While you sleep, your body produces important hormones like collagen and elastin, which help keep your skin looking plump and smooth. And, not getting enough sleep can actually increase inflammation in the body, which can lead to premature ageing.
    So if you want to keep those wrinkles at bay, make sure you get on that early bedtime.

    What is a beauty sleep?

    To put it simply, beauty sleep is when you make sure to get enough shut-eye so that you wake up looking refreshed and radiant. While there’s no definite number of hours how much sleep everyone needs, most experts agree that 7-8 hours is a good range to aim for.

    An image of a young woman drinking her coffee.

    But sleep health is important for many reasons – not just a pretty face. It helps to restore and repair your body, gives you energy, improves your mood, and helps you to focus and learn. Not getting enough sleep can have a negative impact on your physical and mental health.

    Peter

    Peter

    Sleep enthusiast & researcher Sleep is a crucial for a healthy life, in every sense. TSA gave me the place to express my feelings and opinions about the state we spend one third of our lives. In free time - a huge fan of dreams and lucid dreaming. Even started making own dream map
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